Eyjafjallajökull Glacier

“From this legendary glacier its recent eruption and high ash plumes have inspired the world to come to Iceland to see first hand it’s nature untamed.”

The name means “glacier” (or more properly here “ice cap“) of the Eyjafjöll. The word jökull, meaning glacier or ice cap, is cognate with the Middle English word ikel surviving in the -icle of English icicle).
Eyjafjöll is the name given to the southern side of the volcanic massif together with the small mountains which form the foot of the volcano.
The name Eyjafjöll is made up of the words eyja (genitive plural of ey, meaning eyot or island), and the plural word fjöll, meaning fells or mountains), and together literally means: “the mountains of the islands”. The name probably refers to the close-by archipelago of Vestmannaeyjar.
The word fjalla is the genitive plural of fjöll, and so Eyjafjalla is the genitive form of Eyjafjöll and means: “of the Eyjafjöll”. A literal part-by-part translation of Eyjafjallajökull would thus be “Islands’ Mountains’ ice cap”.
Eyjafjallajökull is sometimes referred to by the numeronym “E15”.[8]

Eyjafjallajökull consists of a volcano completely covered by an ice cap. The ice cap covers an area of about 100 square kilometres (39 sq mi), feeding many outlet glaciers. The main outlet glaciers are to the north; Gígjökull, flowing into Lónið, and Steinholtsjökull, flowing into Steinholtslón. The glacier is the 6th largest in Iceland.[4] In 1967 there was a massive landslide on the Steinholtsjökull glacial tongue. On January 15, 1967 at 13.47.55 there was an explosion on the glacier. It can be timed because the earthquake meters in Kirkjubæjarklaustur monitored the movement. When about 15 million cubic meters of material hit the glacier a massive amount of air, ice, and water began to move from under the glacier out into the lagoon at the foot of the glacier.[4]

The mountain itself, a stratovolcano, stands 1,651 metres (5,417 ft) at its highest point, and has a crater 3–4 kilometres (1.9–2.5 mi) in diameter, open to the north. The crater rim has three main peaks, being (clockwise from the north-east) Guðnasteinn, 1,500 metres (4,900 ft) (approx), Hámundur, 1,651 metres (5,417 ft) and Goðasteinn, 1,497 metres (4,911 ft). The south face of the mountain was once part of Iceland’s Atlanticcoastline, from which, over thousands of years, the sea has retreated some 5 kilometres (3.1 mi). The former coastline now consists of sheer cliffs with many waterfalls, of which the best known is Skógafoss. In strong winds, the water of the smaller falls can even be blown up the mountain. The area between the mountain and the present coast is a relatively flat strand, 2 to 5 km wide, called Eyjafjöll.